If you have students in middle and high school who regularly show up without supplies, consider letting them keep a second set of materials in the classroom.

This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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A conference of one’s own

Posted on May 15, 2013 in Families, Inclusion

For the last 20 years, I have long traveled to inclusion conferences in other cities and states. I have seen how an annual conference organized around inclusive schooling can help families, teachers, and administrators learn new skills and provide support to one another.

This is one of the reasons I wished for an inclusion conference here in Illinois. Last week, that wish came…

Fun with preschool teachers

Posted on May 03, 2013 in Inclusion, News

I had to share these great snaps of my final day of training with Education Service Center Region 20 in San Antonio, Texas.

I was able to work with Jenice Dames (early childhood educator extraordinaire) to coach teachers in growing their inclusive preschool models.

Here is a snap of me with Jenice. Can you guess what we are thinking about here?

And here is a shot of some of the wonderful…

Idea #30: Make learning the focus

Posted on April 30, 2013 in Autism

Keep the learning going after today by continuing to visit me here at Paula Kluth.com, checking out my newly updated blog Differentiation Daily, and my Facebook page. I encourage you to…

Idea # 29: Bring a chapter to life

Posted on April 29, 2013 in Autism, Differentiating Instruction

In our book, From Tutor Scripts to Talking Sticks, we recommend that teachers create story kits to provide students with a concrete connection to a story or novel.

We have used concrete objects to teach everything from To Kill a Mockingbird to Romeo & Juliet to Stellaluna. This strategy, however, is not only for…

Idea # 28: Make some no-fuss fidgets

Posted on April 28, 2013 in Autism

Make your own desktop fidgets for times when students just need to wiggle, squirm, and keep busy. When you make your own, you can not only customize your materials for individual learners, but you can then offer options to all students in the inclusive classroom and not just those with identified needs.

These are made with balloons (the thicker the better) and beans, but you can use sand, flour, or any other material that might feel interesting to your students. Just use a funnel to add materials and knot tightly.

Students in upper grades can participate in…

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