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This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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Wordless Wednesday

Posted on March 05, 2014 in News

Dresser drawer label

Flashback Friday: Use inclusion as a teaching tool

Posted on February 28, 2014 in Inclusion

This clip is from the bonus footage of You’re Going to Love This Kid DVD and Professional Development Package. The footage includes a series of 10 questions about inclusion answered by administrators, teachers, and parents.

This is a question about “inclusion for all” and it is being answered by John Price, the former principal of John J. Audubon School in Chicago. John is talking about how inclusive schools can provide opportunities for teachers to educate learners about their individual differences. This, Price maintains, makes all students savvier about their abilities, gifts, and their needs. This won’t happen simply by educating students with and without disabilities together, however. As Price points out, teachers have to be explicit in their support of inclusion and their conversations about it.

Speaker Spotlight: Keith Jones

Posted on February 27, 2014 in News

Today begins my 8 part series “speaker spotlight” designed to introduce you to some fabulous advocates in the field and to give you a peek at the sessions you will see at this year’s Illinois Includes Conference.

I am so excited to highlight the work of Keith Jones to kick off the series. Keith has been doing work in …

Wordless Wednesday

Posted on February 26, 2014 in News

Girls Reading

Flashback Friday: Examine your transportation needs

Posted on February 21, 2014 in Inclusion

Years ago, I worked with a wonderful elementary school. They were committed to making very aspect of the school inclusive, welcoming, and supportive. One issue they had not examined, however, was transportation.

During a visit, I saw a little boy with disabilities skip off an accessible bus, greet his general education classmates as they stood in line on the playground, and enter the building. I asked the principal why he was (a) using specialized transportation and (b) entering the building before his classmates. The principal said, “Um…they all do that.”

By “all”, he meant …

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