Teach all students relaxation strategies (e.g., deep breathing, repeating helpful mantras) that they can use when they are stressed.

This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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Day 1: GoNoodle subscription

Posted on December 01, 2014 in News

If you have been one of my workshops in the last few years, you know I am all about movement, brain breaks and active learning. One of my secret weapons for promoting this work? GoNoodle! I talk about it so much that some people ask me if I work for the company! (I don’t.)

There many great apps, programs, and websites out there to promote movement in the classroom so it is hard to choose a favorite, but GoNoodle seems to be …

12 Days of Inclusion

Posted on December 01, 2014 in Inclusion

It’s time for my annual “12 Days of Inclusion” countdown! This year, I am going to be featuring 12 gift ideas that are appropriate for educators in the inclusive classroom. This list may give you ideas for spending precious PTO dollars or it may provide inspiration for getting a special something for your child’s teacher this holiday season. I am hoping that I will provide at least one or two ideas that all readers find helpful, but if you don’t see anything that seems to fit for your child, your classroom, or your situation on this list, keep in mind that …

Flashback Friday: Visual rubric

Posted on November 28, 2014 in Differentiating Instruction, Inclusion

To create your visual, design your written rubric. Then, translate each step of into a visual. This may not be possible for every rubric you create, but it should work well for writing assignments, some projects, foldables or other graphic organizers, and study tools such as notebook entries. For instance, students in a middle school science class could check the …

Flashback Friday: Individualize standards and objectives

Posted on November 21, 2014 in News

Paula Kluth's "You're Going to Love This Kid" DVD cover

One of the most common misunderstandings of inclusive education is that all learners need to have the same learning targets and outcomes. A teacher told me recently, “What will he do in earth science? He can’t even read!”

This statement suggests that we can’t address literacy goals in a science classroom and maybe even that we should not “bother” teaching a child with such significant learning differences about land forms and earth history. The teacher who shared this statement may not understand that we can not only teach skills this child has on his IEP during earth science (e.g., using his augmentative communication device, reading, following directions), but that we can do so in …

How many seating options?

Posted on November 17, 2014 in Inclusion

If you have seen me present this year, you may have heard me ask the question, “How many ways are there to sit down in your classroom?” Well, one teacher in Wisconsin heard this question and responded by sending me a photo of her inclusive classroom.

This gorgeous space belongs to the lucky students of Angela Barrios. She has created an environment that allows all students to

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