If you are concerned that a student does not understand your directions, ask him/her to repeat them back to you or to a peer.

This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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Resolutions for the inclusive classroom

Posted on January 08, 2015 in Inclusion

Happy New Year!

Those that know me well, know that I love goal setting. I love teaching it to students and I love using it as a tool in my consulting. I also love using it in my own life, especially at this time of year. At my annual New Year’s Eve get together, I always ask guests to share a goal or two at dinner. When this tradition started, it was met with a bit of groaning and eye rolling (okay, more than a bit), but everyone in the group has come to …

Day 4: An inspiring film

Posted on December 04, 2014 in Inclusion, News

Including Samuel, Wretches & Jabberers, Song of Our Children—I don’t know about you, but I LOVE a great inclusion-themed movie! A few years ago, I even made my own film, You’re Going to Love This Kid!, because I feel so strongly in using films to create change. There is just something about the power of pictures, stories, and …

12 Days of Inclusion

Posted on December 01, 2014 in Inclusion

It’s time for my annual “12 Days of Inclusion” countdown! This year, I am going to be featuring 12 gift ideas that are appropriate for educators in the inclusive classroom. This list may give you ideas for spending precious PTO dollars or it may provide inspiration for getting a special something for your child’s teacher this holiday season. I am hoping that I will provide at least one or two ideas that all readers find helpful, but if you don’t see anything that seems to fit for your child, your classroom, or your situation on this list, keep in mind that …

Flashback Friday: Visual rubric

Posted on November 28, 2014 in Differentiating Instruction, Inclusion

To create your visual, design your written rubric. Then, translate each step of into a visual. This may not be possible for every rubric you create, but it should work well for writing assignments, some projects, foldables or other graphic organizers, and study tools such as notebook entries. For instance, students in a middle school science class could check the …

How many seating options?

Posted on November 17, 2014 in Inclusion

If you have seen me present this year, you may have heard me ask the question, “How many ways are there to sit down in your classroom?” Well, one teacher in Wisconsin heard this question and responded by sending me a photo of her inclusive classroom.

This gorgeous space belongs to the lucky students of Angela Barrios. She has created an environment that allows all students to

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