Design alternatives to the book report. Students might make video reviews, design alternative book covers, write a letter to the author or assemble a scrapbook.

This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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Differentiation Hack: Sticky-note supports

Posted on March 15, 2017 in Differentiating Instruction

You might use a sticky note to mark your page in a book or leave a reminder for a colleague, but these handy little scraps are useful for so much more.

You can jot letters or words on sticky notes and have students compose words and sentences without using a pencil.

You can have students add them to interactive notebooks to highlight …

Differentiation Hack: All-about-me alternatives

Posted on August 30, 2016 in Differentiating Instruction

Differentiation Hack is a new series I am starting on the blog. Each hack is a trip or strategy that will help you create supports using a shortcut, repurposed materials, or tools you already have around-the-classroom.

Make sure you give students a few different ways to tell you about themselves. Some learners can easily write a paragraph or talk to the class about their likes, dislikes, interests, needs, and gifts. Others, may feel need a little support to do so. You might want to …

Making Mt. Rushmore

Posted on December 08, 2014 in Differentiating Instruction

I just love innovative teaching ideas—especially those that may boost comprehension for diverse learners, allow students to move and provide visual supports for those needing them. This idea is fab because it does all three of those things! It comes from a wonderful elementary school teacher in Sauk Prairie, Wisconsin.

When her students struggled to understand just how big the Mt. Rushmore faces were, she took them outside and positioned them in the …

Flashback Friday: Visual rubric

Posted on November 28, 2014 in Differentiating Instruction, Inclusion

To create your visual, design your written rubric. Then, translate each step of into a visual. This may not be possible for every rubric you create, but it should work well for writing assignments, some projects, foldables or other graphic organizers, and study tools such as notebook entries. For instance, students in a middle school science class could check the …

Flashback Friday: Bring a chapter to life

Posted on November 14, 2014 in Differentiating Instruction, News

In our book, From Tutor Scripts to Talking Sticks, we recommend that teachers create story kits to provide students with a concrete connection to a story or novel. We have used concrete objects to teach everything from To Kill a Mockingbird to Romeo & Juliet to Stellaluna. This strategy, however, is not only for teaching literature. Textbook boxes can also be created. That is, objects related to a given chapter can be collected and used to teach the objectives in any unit or lesson.

This 3-D chapter was assembled for a chapter on electricity. Objects were used to help students …

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