If you have students in middle and high school who regularly show up without supplies, consider letting them keep a second set of materials in the classroom.

This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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Day 2: Quick quip keychain

Posted on December 02, 2013 in Differentiating Instruction, Inclusion

To encourage participation in daily lessons, some of your students may benefit from quick and easy supplements to their primary communication systems. Quick quip key chains are not enough to meet all or even most of a student’s communication needs, but they can work well in environments where students do not have easy access to their other systems (e.g., school bus) or in situations where just a few messages will do the trick.

To create your own quick-quip keychain evaluate learning environments and activities to find “holes” where the learner may benefit from increased access to communication. Then, decide which messages might be needed for that particular situation or activity. If the student cannot brainstorm with you, turn to peers for ideas or listen to learners as they interact in that situation or during that activity and make your decisions based on these observations.

For more differentiation ideas for K-12 classrooms, check out From Text Maps to Memory Caps [Paul Brookes Publishing].

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