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This website is dedicated to promoting inclusive schooling and exploring positive ways of supporting students with autism and other disabilities. Most of my work involves collaborating with schools to create environments, lessons, and experiences that are inclusive, respectful, and accessible for all learners.

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Inclusion projects worth your dollar

Posted on November 15, 2013 in Inclusion

Lately, I have been noticing all of the ways that organizations, schools, and groups are fundraising in creative ways to make their inclusive visions come true. The big change I am seeing is the use of social media and websites to spread the word and collect many small donations to make huge changes. This is exciting because it means that little projects that might never have seen the light of day can become realities. It also means that we can all help to create change with our participation in these campaigns. This is just one more way to move inclusion forward in our communities and in the world.

Here are a few inspiring stories. I hope that you may not only a project to potentially fund, but get an idea for acquiring funding for an inclusive dream you have. These three examples not only feature important work, but highlight three different sites that can help you fundraise.

Indiegogo
If you follow me on Facebook you may have seen that I wrote about Justin Canha’s new film project, Don’t Foil My Plans. He is using Indiegogo to get his story of pursuing his ideal (and inclusive) post-school life out there and so far, he has been very successful. He has raised thousands and is still in the process of raising more to get through the marketing, editing, and promotional parts of the project. Visit Justin’s project on Indiegogo to learn more his project.

Donors Choose
I have had the privilege of working with an amazing school in Baltimore this year, The Commodore John Rodgers School.

One of the things that makes them amazing is the work they have done to “turn around” their failing school. They started as one of the worst schools in the city and they are now one of the most celebrated. Did I mention they are also proud to call themselves an inclusive school?

There are too many secrets of their success to mention here but one of them is that they have a “whatever it takes” attitude to help kids achieve and to meet their goals. Therefore, they fundraise in all sorts of interesting ways. One idea that they recently had was to get their male staff members to grow mustaches in November as a humorous way to draw attention to an on-line fundraising project. They are using Donors Choose for their campaign, which is a fantastic resource for funding “pencils to poetry to microscopes for mitochondria”.

You can fund many different projects for The Commodore John Rodgers School on Donors Choose. Some of them have already been funded completely but there are still a few important materials yet to be purchased.

Teachers Pay Teachers
Many of you may already know about Teachers Pay Teachers (TPT) from colleagues, but if you don’t, you should definitely check it out.

It isn’t a fundraising site in the same way as Donor’s Choose and Indiegogo, but it does help teachers financially in that they can sell lesson plans, teacher-created materials and more to put a few dollars in their pockets. Teachers Pay Teachers has the potential to do more than that, however. For those of you with great ideas for curriculum and instruction that is accessible, differentiated, and, therefore, inclusive, this site can help you export a philosophy and useful teaching tools. You may recall, for instance, that I blogged about this lesson plan from Lynne Dudas a few weeks ago. For $1.00, you can get her Kiddie Lit Kit which features standards-based lessons for books like Pedro’s Whale (a personal favorite of mine)!

Browse TPT for more ideas for the inclusive classroom. Better yet, post your own!

How are you fundraising for your inclusive vision?

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